x

#{title}

#{text}

Music News

Music publisher pays huge in law suit for 'Happy Birthday', it will still go into public domain next month

Music publisher pays huge in law suit for 'Happy Birthday', it will still go into public domain next

Music publisher Warner/Chappell has been charging the world buckets to use the song 'Happy Birthday' for years. 

Well it turns out that they may not actually own the piece. Warner/Chappell bought the rights for $22m in 1988 and has since made an estimated $2m a year licensing the song for movies and TV. But back in September, US district judge George H King ruled that the company didn't own the lyrics for the song, but just a few of its musical arrangements.

This led to a lawsuit of mammoth proportions, however, they've decided to settle outside of court for $14m. Next month, the song will be available to the public, if the settlement is approved by Judge King.

Despite the fact that Warner/Chappell “respectfully disagreed with the court’s decision”, the majority of the $14m settlement will be used to compensate everyone who has paid a fee for the use of the song in the past. The legal team representing the plaintiffs are seeking a $4.62m fee for their work on the case. 

"Happy Birthday is finally free after 80 years. Finally, the charade is over. It’s unbelievable,” Randall Newman, an attorney for the plaintiffs, said back in September when King ruled that Warner/Chappell did not have right to the song. 

Get ready for lots of birthday plots on your favourite Robson Green programmes.

And less moments like this.


Previous Story

Conservative Party tout 'Labour girl...

The fact that Adele has described herself as a "Labour girl through and through" isn't stopping the Conservative...

Next Story

Kanye West thinks Bill Cosby is...

Despite around 50 accusations from different women, Kanye West believes that the maligned Bill Cosby is "innocent"....

Comments