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Music News

Sigur Ros have a large tax shaped problem

Sigur Ros have a large tax shaped problem
If you’ve wondered what Sigur Ros have been up to lately, the answer is pursued through the Icelandic courts for unpaid tax. Now, the band themselves deny any deliberate attempt to commit fraud, have accepted that their accountants created a £840,000 gap in taxes paid, have pled guilty and paid both the amount and fines, meaning they’ve paid 150% now.
 
But due to Icelandic law and a lack of double jeopardy, the band are still being pursued in the courts for it. They have now appealed to the government (and the public) in a statement:
 
“Since we discovered that our financial advisors had seriously misled us over our tax liabilities for the period 2011-2014 we have trusted in the judicial process, which we truly believed would exonerate us of any wilful wrongdoing. We have always provided our full cooperation to all investigations and reached an agreement with the Icelandic tax authorities to pay what we owed plus interest and fines.
 
“However, in the intervening years we have become victims of an unjust and draconian prosecution by the Icelandic government who are unfairly seeking to portray us as deliberate tax evaders, something we have always and continue to strongly deny. We have been charged and tried twice for the same offence, our assets have been frozen for years now, we are facing potential financial ruin and as such we are calling on the Icelandic government to revoke these outdated double jeopardy tax laws, which have affected numerous Icelandic businesses.
 
“The Icelandic government has now paused any further prosecutions as a result of these concerns but is still actively pursuing over 100 open cases, which is contradictory and makes no sense at all. We want to shine a light on systemic failures rather than individuals. We know that the legislation is broken and that the courts have their hands tied at present. This needs to be urgently addressed.
 
“We are fortunate to have a platform in order to speak out about this and we do so not just for ourselves but for the many others who have been caught up in this shameful failure of the Icelandic legal system, which does nothing but embarrass our country.” 

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