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Film, Album, Single and Event Reviews

Live Review: Liam Gallagher dusts down the classics at Glasto 2019

  • By Spiderman
  • 29 Jun 2019
  • Event Date 29 Jun 2019
Liam G gives the people what they want at Glasto
They say that if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. And Liam Gallagher isn’t one to reinvent the wheel. As he stands on the Pyramid Stage peering out to those of us present and it quickly hits home that it is not until Gallagher jr unleashes Shockwave, his first single from his upcoming album, that we get any variation from the setlist that he played on the Other Stage here two years ago. 
 
But there’s a sense of purpose about the man. His commitment to the cause of rock n’ roll is readily apparent in the songs that he opts to exhumes from his past. But first things first. Fuckin in the Bushes rings out and Liam appears with maracas in hand and game face on. 
 
Replete with trademark swagger, if not trademark parka (of which he complains about, of course) he assaults the sense with a rapid-fire one-two of Rock n’ Roll Star and Morning Glory before Wall of Glass ripples in the early evening air. All of which are rapturously received. He provides us with a window into his second solo record with the chugging riff of River with its ‘down by the river refrain’ (Neil Young might have something to say about that).  
 
In fact, aside from a few forays into his present and future, this main stage set is a keen and crowd-pleasing exploration of his past. The roll call of songs are generously weighted in favour of his old band. We get rare, precious outings: Slide Away is dedicated to a lady that he met last year who was very ill; a nagging, frenetic Roll With It; the louche march of Cigarettes and Alcohol; the cyclical choppy chords of Columbia; the bucolic refrain of Wonderwall; a fiery Supersonic; and a closing piano-version of Champagne Supernova. It hits many of the right spots.
 
His voice might not reach the heights that it once did, as evidenced on a dodgy chorus to Bold, but it is in better shape than it has for a long time. Far better than the Beady Eye period in particular. 
 
One complaint though. If he is so enamoured with the tracks off of Definitely Maybe (as he rightly should be), it is a surprise that alongside his Wall of Glass, he doesn’t imbue his solo work with the same Wall of Sound as that mighty record. 
 

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